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Credit Repair

Why Bankruptcy Filings Require Credit Counseling Approval

22 Jan , 2016  

This is honestly why credit counseling and credit repair are so important to us. It’s considered the first step to remedy disaster — and the disaster can come in many forms…. Identity theft, lack of bookkeeping resources, lack of legal assistance even! The list can go on and on. And while bankruptcy filings can solve plenty of issues, we always go with credit repair as the main source of success to avoid any clean slate. Having a bankruptcy on your credit report isn’t exactly a shining gem, a question you should have in your repertoire of questions for any credit counselor.

The Law Actually Requires That You Attend a “Briefing” With a Credit credit counseling-1Counseling Agency, Believe It or Not

And for good reason. You need to know for sure what you’re going to be facing in the event of your bankruptcy filing, regardless of whether or not it’s going to be a Chapter 7 or 13. While you may get that clean slate, make no mistake: it’ll be just as easy to let your budgeting and money management fall by the wayside and get back into the same situation of financial failure and credit counseling that brought you to the legal side in the first place.

That briefing will be your instructional course on personal finance coordination, something the Income Tax Planning Network could assist you with — and this is crucial to consider before your debts are ever discharged. Once you’ve completed the course, of course, you get that sign-off you need as mandated by the law to go through with the bankruptcy filing.

Brings About an Important Point You Have to Keep in Mind

Bankruptcy isn’t supposed to be a “way out.” It’s an option. For some, it may be the only option. It’s, for sure, never a crutch; and it never should be. So you always want to be sure that if you’re faced with the option for bankruptcy, make sure through credit counseling that it is, indeed, your only option!

The post Why Bankruptcy Filings Require Credit Counseling Approval appeared first on Independent Credit Solutions.

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Home Renting,Real Estate Market,Rent-to-Own Homes,Taxes

What to Do With Rental Properties on Taxes When Getting Divorced

22 Jan , 2016  

RTO is one thing; what about rental properties? What if you are the landlord/homeowner? What if you are the one offering that rent-to-own property? What if you are the one offering that rent-to-own property, and you get divorced with your spouse? What can you do with those rental properties? How does that affect your taxes? What will happen to your tenants?

Questions, Questions, Questions — Stressful, Stressful, STRESSFULrental properties knot

Whenever on the subject of taxes, the prospect’s overwhelming. You’ve got that tax return to file. You’re not great with numbers — and let’s not forget about the fact that you’re dealing with divorce, and there are plenty of options on your plate about what to do with the home (and the kids, finances, cars, etc. etc.). Now you have to also worry about rental properties, tenants, and other stuff. It can be a headache.

Here’s what you have to understand about rental property: they’re not your primary residences. Hence tax issues will be a bit different than when considering your actual home, the actual place you live in.

We all know there are tax benefits when selling a home (only when it’s your actual place of residence, though). When you divorce, the question is this: do you want to share ownership of those rental properties (in which case you’ll both pay taxes on them)? Or do you want to transfer ownership to the ex-spouse? It’s good to know that transfer of ownership won’t cause any tax repercussions for either spouse. However, you most likely will pay taxes if and when you ever sell those rental properties; so keep that in mind.

Those Rental Properties Need to Be Addressed

Of course, rental properties are a source of revenue. You want it, you pay property taxes for it; you don’t want it, transfer ownership. If both spouses don’t want the rental properties in question — be prepared. Consult with an attorney, if you will, but be sure to discuss your situation with an expert from the Income Tax Planning Network immediately. You don’t want to leave this loose end untied.

 

The post What to Do With Rental Properties on Taxes When Getting Divorced appeared first on RentToOwnReviews.

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Home Selling,Taxes

Maximizing Tax Benefits for Selling the Home After Kids Grow Up

6 Jan , 2016  

Divorce doesn’t have to destroy the kids. There are options out there, and they’re not to blame. So it just so happens that many divorcing couples find the option to keep the home when dealing with a divorce until those kids move out when they’re older. There’s a specific reason to doing this, in that it’s not going to be a forever thing when owning the home indefinitely — eventually, that home will get sold!

The Tax Benefits Are Obvious, But Keep This Important Point in Mind….divorce tax-5

If you’re going to sell that home later on, make sure you get that attorney on your side to stipulate in the divorce agreement that the home still is your “main residence” for tax purposes. The law states that you won’t get the tax benefits of selling the home if you’re not living in the home for at least two of the last five years of that primary residence.

So if the son and daughter are only in their teen years, and you’ve moved out, selling the home leaves you high and dry while the ex-spouse reaps the tax benefits. Therefore make a point to research with the Income Tax Planning Network and find out what you need to do to settle the issue correctly.

Because Selling a Home Can Be a Benefit

Tax benefit, to be exact. It just takes timing. And divorce is anything but timely. Make it a point to sign up with ITPN and talk to an expert immediately. Get the lawyer, too, while you’re at it. Divorce doesn’t have to destroy the finances, especially when you’re facing the issue of selling that home. Either you sell the home and make anywhere around $250K in profit, or you’re not paying attention to those tax laws and have to fork over a ton of that profit to the IRS. You pick.

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